Now I am an axolotl
Now I am an axolotl
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laphamsquarterly:

Considering buying some of these for the LQ office….
classicpenguin:

Toronto designer Ryan McArthur (of Design Different) has been making pen and ink illustrations of some classic quotes—from Emerson, Hugo, Johnson, Melville… a few folks who have something to say. 
Just beautiful.
laphamsquarterly:

Considering buying some of these for the LQ office….
classicpenguin:

Toronto designer Ryan McArthur (of Design Different) has been making pen and ink illustrations of some classic quotes—from Emerson, Hugo, Johnson, Melville… a few folks who have something to say. 
Just beautiful.
laphamsquarterly:

Considering buying some of these for the LQ office….
classicpenguin:

Toronto designer Ryan McArthur (of Design Different) has been making pen and ink illustrations of some classic quotes—from Emerson, Hugo, Johnson, Melville… a few folks who have something to say. 
Just beautiful.
laphamsquarterly:

Considering buying some of these for the LQ office….
classicpenguin:

Toronto designer Ryan McArthur (of Design Different) has been making pen and ink illustrations of some classic quotes—from Emerson, Hugo, Johnson, Melville… a few folks who have something to say. 
Just beautiful.
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artandsciencejournal:

Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
“I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations.”
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
“I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations.”
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
“I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations.”
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
“I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations.”
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
“I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations.”
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

Peter Carrington
Peter Carrington, an illustrator from Manchester, makes artworks about  science, natural history and his struggle to gain knowledge. As Carrington states, 
“I’ve always had an interest in science and nature, and during my studies I decided to combine this with my practice. Through deeper research into different scientific areas it quickly became apparent that, due to having dyslexia, I was never going to get a grip of the topics to make work that wasn’t shallow and ill-informed. I became frustrated that I wouldn’t be able to use the visual language of the sciences that I had become obsessed with. It was at this point that this frustration became the forefront of the work and the drawings became a portrait of me and my struggle with dyslexia. I began using the visuals of science and natural history journals to create seemingly scientific illustrations.”
Carrington’s work harkens back to the history of biology and botany, where drawing and labels were the key to all knowledge, then he adds his own bit of mystical influence. Now Carrington is focusing on the human need for order. Through labels and numbers he demonstrates our need to categorize. To see more of his work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
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theparisreview:

“When I was a young man I was always hunting for new metaphors. Then I found out that really good metaphors are always the same. I mean you compare time to a road, death to sleeping, life to dreaming, and those are the great metaphors in literature because they correspond to something essential. If you invent metaphors, they are apt to be surprising during the fraction of a second, but they strike no deep emotion whatever. If you think of life as a dream, that is a thought, a thought that is real, or at least that most men are bound to have, no? ‘What oft was thought, but ne’er so well expressed.’ I think that’s better than the idea of shocking people, than finding connections between things that have never been connected before, because there is no real connection, so the whole thing is a kind of juggling.”
—Happy birthday, Jorge Luis Borges, who would have been 113 today.
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lareviewofbooks:

More from photographer and People’s Guide author Wendy Cheng: 
“As a photographer, it is also a formal challenge — how do you make an absence present? At the former site of the building that housed the Black Panther Party’s (BPP) Los Angeles headquarters (leveled after an LAPD raid destroyed the building in 1969), you might take 20 steps back, so you can see how the still-empty lot makes for a conspicuous, sun-filled gap in between a building that was once the BPP building’s twin and a two-story strip mall selling all manner of goods and services. At the strip of Vermont Avenue in Koreatown that, from the 1940s through the 1960s, was home to two working-class, multiracial, butch lesbian bars, you might squint your eyes and imagine the warm, secretive anticipation the bars’ clientele felt as they turned onto this block from 8th Street; and smile at the name of the store that currently occupies one of the addresses: King’s Jewelry and Loan.”
Read more about invisible places like the BP headquarters, If Cafe, and proposed Vernon incinerator here: from Part 2 of LARB’s People’s Guide series.
lareviewofbooks:

More from photographer and People’s Guide author Wendy Cheng: 
“As a photographer, it is also a formal challenge — how do you make an absence present? At the former site of the building that housed the Black Panther Party’s (BPP) Los Angeles headquarters (leveled after an LAPD raid destroyed the building in 1969), you might take 20 steps back, so you can see how the still-empty lot makes for a conspicuous, sun-filled gap in between a building that was once the BPP building’s twin and a two-story strip mall selling all manner of goods and services. At the strip of Vermont Avenue in Koreatown that, from the 1940s through the 1960s, was home to two working-class, multiracial, butch lesbian bars, you might squint your eyes and imagine the warm, secretive anticipation the bars’ clientele felt as they turned onto this block from 8th Street; and smile at the name of the store that currently occupies one of the addresses: King’s Jewelry and Loan.”
Read more about invisible places like the BP headquarters, If Cafe, and proposed Vernon incinerator here: from Part 2 of LARB’s People’s Guide series.
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motherjones:

nickturse:

Members of the Russian punk feminist group “Pussy Riot,” Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich.

In case you haven’t been following, here’s our explainer.
motherjones:

nickturse:

Members of the Russian punk feminist group “Pussy Riot,” Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich.

In case you haven’t been following, here’s our explainer.
motherjones:

nickturse:

Members of the Russian punk feminist group “Pussy Riot,” Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich.

In case you haven’t been following, here’s our explainer.
motherjones:

nickturse:

Members of the Russian punk feminist group “Pussy Riot,” Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich.

In case you haven’t been following, here’s our explainer.
motherjones:

nickturse:

Members of the Russian punk feminist group “Pussy Riot,” Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich.

In case you haven’t been following, here’s our explainer.
motherjones:

nickturse:

Members of the Russian punk feminist group “Pussy Riot,” Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alyokhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich.

In case you haven’t been following, here’s our explainer.
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museumoflatinamericanart:

Lola Álvarez Bravo (Mexico, 1907-1993)
Mariana Yampolsky, 1940s
Gelatin silver print
Familia González Rendón Collection
© 1995 Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation
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gwenlafage:

Fresh off the press and new at Carte Blanche is the summer issue of FOAM International Photography Magazine- #31 ref. 
The Summer issue of Foam Magazine reflects deeply on relationships between photography and reference. Ref. deals with the engaged appropriation of a particular style, author or event and with the deconstruction, manipulation and demystification of existing visual icons and clichés. We look into portfolios that dig into, and play with our feelings of déjà-vu by bringing pre-existing images to life. Firing the synapses in our brains causes surprising visual and mental connections that create a multilayered, reverberating body of work. 
Ref. presents eight portfolios which refer each in their own way to other photos, a specific visual style or language, or to stereotypical visual elements that we recognize from other photographic genres. They are all portfolios that recognize that nothing exists in splendid isolation.
gwenlafage:

Fresh off the press and new at Carte Blanche is the summer issue of FOAM International Photography Magazine- #31 ref. 
The Summer issue of Foam Magazine reflects deeply on relationships between photography and reference. Ref. deals with the engaged appropriation of a particular style, author or event and with the deconstruction, manipulation and demystification of existing visual icons and clichés. We look into portfolios that dig into, and play with our feelings of déjà-vu by bringing pre-existing images to life. Firing the synapses in our brains causes surprising visual and mental connections that create a multilayered, reverberating body of work. 
Ref. presents eight portfolios which refer each in their own way to other photos, a specific visual style or language, or to stereotypical visual elements that we recognize from other photographic genres. They are all portfolios that recognize that nothing exists in splendid isolation.
gwenlafage:

Fresh off the press and new at Carte Blanche is the summer issue of FOAM International Photography Magazine- #31 ref. 
The Summer issue of Foam Magazine reflects deeply on relationships between photography and reference. Ref. deals with the engaged appropriation of a particular style, author or event and with the deconstruction, manipulation and demystification of existing visual icons and clichés. We look into portfolios that dig into, and play with our feelings of déjà-vu by bringing pre-existing images to life. Firing the synapses in our brains causes surprising visual and mental connections that create a multilayered, reverberating body of work. 
Ref. presents eight portfolios which refer each in their own way to other photos, a specific visual style or language, or to stereotypical visual elements that we recognize from other photographic genres. They are all portfolios that recognize that nothing exists in splendid isolation.
gwenlafage:

Fresh off the press and new at Carte Blanche is the summer issue of FOAM International Photography Magazine- #31 ref. 
The Summer issue of Foam Magazine reflects deeply on relationships between photography and reference. Ref. deals with the engaged appropriation of a particular style, author or event and with the deconstruction, manipulation and demystification of existing visual icons and clichés. We look into portfolios that dig into, and play with our feelings of déjà-vu by bringing pre-existing images to life. Firing the synapses in our brains causes surprising visual and mental connections that create a multilayered, reverberating body of work. 
Ref. presents eight portfolios which refer each in their own way to other photos, a specific visual style or language, or to stereotypical visual elements that we recognize from other photographic genres. They are all portfolios that recognize that nothing exists in splendid isolation.
gwenlafage:

Fresh off the press and new at Carte Blanche is the summer issue of FOAM International Photography Magazine- #31 ref. 
The Summer issue of Foam Magazine reflects deeply on relationships between photography and reference. Ref. deals with the engaged appropriation of a particular style, author or event and with the deconstruction, manipulation and demystification of existing visual icons and clichés. We look into portfolios that dig into, and play with our feelings of déjà-vu by bringing pre-existing images to life. Firing the synapses in our brains causes surprising visual and mental connections that create a multilayered, reverberating body of work. 
Ref. presents eight portfolios which refer each in their own way to other photos, a specific visual style or language, or to stereotypical visual elements that we recognize from other photographic genres. They are all portfolios that recognize that nothing exists in splendid isolation.
gwenlafage:

Fresh off the press and new at Carte Blanche is the summer issue of FOAM International Photography Magazine- #31 ref. 
The Summer issue of Foam Magazine reflects deeply on relationships between photography and reference. Ref. deals with the engaged appropriation of a particular style, author or event and with the deconstruction, manipulation and demystification of existing visual icons and clichés. We look into portfolios that dig into, and play with our feelings of déjà-vu by bringing pre-existing images to life. Firing the synapses in our brains causes surprising visual and mental connections that create a multilayered, reverberating body of work. 
Ref. presents eight portfolios which refer each in their own way to other photos, a specific visual style or language, or to stereotypical visual elements that we recognize from other photographic genres. They are all portfolios that recognize that nothing exists in splendid isolation.